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Congenital Laryngeal Stridor

What is congenital laryngeal stridor?

Congenital laryngeal stridor results from a congenital (present at birth) anomaly of the larynx (voice box). A weakness in the structures in the larynx, can cause stridor. Stridor is a high-pitched sound that is heard best when the child breathes in (inspiration), which indicates a partial obstruction in the upper airways. 

What causes congenital laryngeal stridor?

Congenital laryngeal stridor is a defect that is present at birth. During fetal development, the structures in the larynx may not fully develop. As a result, there is a weakness in these structures at birth, causing them to collapse during breathing. In children, congenital laryngeal stridor is the most common cause of chronic stridor.

What are the symptoms of congenital laryngeal stridor?

The major symptom of this disorder is the stridor that is heard as the infant breathes. The stridor is usually heard when the infant breathes in (inspiration), but can also be heard when the infant breaths out (expiration). Other characteristics of the stridor may include:

  • The stridor changes with activity.

  • The stridor is present during different phases of alertness--eating, sleeping, or excitement.

  • The stridor is usually less noisy when the child is laying on his or her stomach.

  • The stridor gets worse if the infant has an upper respiratory infection.

The symptoms of congenital laryngeal stridor may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Always consult your child's doctor for a diagnosis.

How is congenital laryngeal stridor diagnosed?

In addition to a complete medical history and physical examination, diagnostic procedures for congenital laryngeal stridor may include laryngoscopy or bronchoscopy of the airways--a procedure which involves a tube being passed into the airways to allow your child's doctor to observe the airways during breathing.

Treatment for congenital laryngeal stridor

In most cases, congenital laryngeal stridor is a harmless condition that resolves on its own, without medical intervention. Each child's case is unique. A small percentage develop severe respiratory problems which require medical and surgical interventions.

Online Medical Reviewer: Bass, Pat F. III, MD, MPH
Online Medical Reviewer: Finke, Amy, RN, BSN
Last Review Date: 5/24/2012
© 2000-2015 The StayWell Company, LLC. 780 Township Line Road, Yardley, PA 19067. All rights reserved. This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Always follow your healthcare professional's instructions.

404 - Page not Found.

The page you are looking for may have moved or no longer exists. Please use our feedback form to report this page as missing.

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Contact Us

For general inquiries, please call the main number at 202-476-5000.

Thank you for visiting and sorry again for the inconvenience.

Children's National in Your Neighborhood

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Did you know Children’s National has more than 50 locations throughout the region? Find one that’s convenient for your family.

Find a Children's Location Near You